Recently we were lucky enough to be supporting partner of the Regional Flavours Festival at South Bank in Brisbane.

We had a fantastic time making Jelly Worms and Sherbet, and explaining some of the science behind these yummy snacks.

In case you missed out, or did get to make some and just want to make some more, we have the recipes and instructions for Jelly Worms and Sherbet below.

 

Jelly Worms

Ingredients

5g Sodium Alginate
2 cups of pre-mixed cordial (it’s better if it is a strong mix)

1 teaspoon Calcium Lactate or Calcium Chloride
2 cups of water

A pipette or dropper bottle will also be very handy (or an empty squeezy tomato sauce bottle)

 

Instructions

Mix the Sodium Alginate with the cordial together in a blender or with a hand blender. It should get thicker and may foam up – the worms work best if you wait for the foam to disappear.

In a separate bowl mix the Calcium Lactate with water until the Calcium Lactate dissolves.

Use the pipette or dropper bottle to squirt the Sodium Alginate/cordial solution into the Calcium Lactate/water solution.

A long squirt will make a worm. A small drop will make a little sphere.

Scoop out your worms or spheres with a fork.

Eat and enjoy!

 

Hints

  • Leave your worm in the water for a minute or two otherwise it may break apart when you scoop it out.
  • Sodium Alginate and Calcium Lactate are chemicals used in Molecular Gastronomy and generally aren’t available at the supermarket. Online stores are your best bet. We sourced ours from http://www.molecularfoods.com.au/

 

Sherbet

Ingredients

1 teaspoon Bicarb Soda
1 teaspoon Citric Acid
1 teaspoon Jelly Crystals
2 teaspoons Icing Mixture

 

Instructions

In a zip lock bag mix all ingredients together.

Lick your finger and dip into the mixture to eat.

 

Hints

  • All these ingredients are available from the supermarket. You may already have them in your pantry. Citric acid is usually located in the baking section of the supermarket.
  • Be careful to add the correct amounts, especially with the bicarb and citric acid. To much bicarb will leave a soapy taste, and too much citric acid will leave a strong sour taste.
  • If you like you can always add an extra teaspoon of jelly crystals or icing mixture to sweeten up your sherbet.